Virginia to Rick Perry: ‘Get Lost’

January 16, 2012

By Cole

Friday the 13th was unlucky for Rick Perry & Co. (Gingrich, Santorum, and Huntsman). A federal judge ruled they couldn’t play the Virginia primary game, lose, and then whine about its unfair rules.

(Actually, Santorum and Huntsman were just hoping to catch a break. They hadn’t previously tried to qualify for the ballot in Virginia.)

And in a twist whose irony was apparently lost on this rat pack, they complained that having to hire Virginia residents to gather votes is TOO EXPENSIVE ($50K-$100K).

So, Virginia’s Republican primary on March 6 will have only Mitt Romney and Ron Paul on the ballot, with no write-ins allowed.

On another front, the state GOP is considering scrapping its loyalty oath, which all primary voters must sign, promising to support the eventual Republican nominee. Even Virginia’s Republican governor, Bob McDonnell, who typically loves any discriminatory, backward idea that crosses his path, thinks this unenforceable oath is a bad idea.

Waiving the oath could open the door for Democrats and independents to flood the polls, hand Paul a resounding victory, and give Romney another dose of heartburn.

Wouldn’t that be sweet?

Perry’s appealing the ruling, but it’s too late. By law, absentee ballots for the military and other votes have to go out by January 21, so Virginia can’t keep diddling around with this indefinitely.

Besides, this mess is probably self-inflicted, if we believe the person who watched Republican volunteers qualifying the signatures candidates collected and tossing out enough, often on a whim, to make Perry come up short. (So did Gingrich, but he admitted some of his names were bogus.)

But after watching George W. Bush “win” twice in questionable squeakers, voting hanky-panky is sort of expected from Republicans. They talk about loving this country, then treat it like some banana republic, where rules can always be bent to their advantage.


Christie Lets the Loonies Churn

October 5, 2011

By Cole

What part of “I’m not running for president” don’t the Republicans understand? New Jersey governor Chris Christie has told them for the MILLIONTH time he doesn’t want the job.

If Republicans hadn’t humored Tea Party wackos, they wouldn’t have ended up with the motley collection of fools and misfits who have risen to the top of the party like swamp scum.

Now they’ve got to live with it.

Meanwhile, Sarah Palin in her garish bus is popping wheelies in Walmart parking lots all over Nowhere, USA, trying to get somebody’s attention and praying for the Tea Party to come and beg her to be the savior who drives Obama out of office.

Her requirements for the job are simple:

  • No participating in debates
  • No interviews or Q&As she hasn’t scripted
  • No running in pesky primaries

If Palin had it her way, there would be no election, either. She’d just be anointed — and probably get bored and quit 2 years into her term.

I have no idea how good or bad a governor Chris Christie is (I’m sure reader MorganLF can fill us in), but his refusal to let himself be talked into running seems like a sign of integrity, which is unheard of in a politician.

Of what remains, here’s my feline take …

  • Michele Bachmann – Talked herself into oblivion, thank goodness.
  • Rick Santorum – Invisible Man.
  • Mitt Romney – Sleeps in a coffin.
  • Newt Gingrich – Senile.
  • Rick Perry – Keeps letting his mouth shoot him in the foot.
  • Ron Paul – Flake with a few good ideas.
  • Jon Huntsman – My favorite, but reason and common sense doom him.
  • Herman Cain – Hmmmm…

Cain’s star is rising, but could the Tea Party ever stomach a race between 2 black cats?

I suspect TPers would stay home in droves on election day, finally dispelling any doubt they’re a bunch of racists. If it came down to casting a vote for ANOTHER black man (I mean, where’s it going to end?), they’d just let Obama stay in the White House.


Genetic Testing Discrimination Ban: One Small Step

May 2, 2008

By Karen

Congress has pried one weapon from the fingers of health insurers and employers – the misuse of genetic testing results. In a stunning display of willpower against powerful business and insurance lobbyists, the House voted 414-1 and the Senate 95-0.

If you’ve been wondering whatever became of presidential candidate Ron Paul, he was the one opposing bonehead, saying, “Because of the federal government’s poor record in protecting privacy, I do not believe the best way to address concerns about the misuse of genetic information is through intrusive federal legislation.”

Bush doesn’t even plan to be an obstruction on this one.

Protecting people from having genetic test results held against them is hardly a new concept. Forty-one states already have laws against insurers doing it, and 31 states extend it to the workplace.

Nor will this law necessarily change anything without some landmark lawsuits favoring individuals. It’s a given that insurers and employers will continue trying to get their mitts on such information. They’ll just be sneakier about using it and make it more difficult for anyone to prove they did.

The only way to make real progress in nullifying anyone’s health status – real or just genetically possible – is to completely sever healthcare from employment, and to make healthcare affordable and available to everyone by removing the bureaucracy of health insurance altogether.

But this vote does indicate that every member of Congress – except Ron Paul – realizes their job security depends on getting serious about this mess and fixing it.


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